Prescription Drug Abuse

 

Our Efforts:

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During the 2011 Regular Legislative Session, the New Mexico State Legislature passed House Memorial 77, creating the Prescription Drug Abuse and Overdose task force.

This task force was asked to address the rising rate of abuse, addiction and unintentional overdose death due to prescription drugs, and provided recommendations for rules and enforcement protocols. During the 2012 Legislative Session, several initiatives were introduced to put the work of the HM77 task force to action, among them Senate Bills 215 and 158. These bills proposed revisions to the Pain Relief Act that would increase patient-prescriber awareness and consent when an opioid prescription is written for pain management. Although SB158 did not pass, the Board of Pharmacy has taken up the work of enhancing and requiring usage of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Database, which will assist with holding doctors accountable for the opioid prescriptions they write.

 

Our Goals:

Our goal is to increase education on the risks of opioid drugs by making the public aware of the dangers associated with their abuse.

By passing the revision of the Pain Relief Act and expanding the Prescription Drug Monitoring Database, it is our hope that within one year, the statistic of 27 deaths for every 100,000 New Mexicans will be significantly reduced, and thereby remove New Mexico as the number one prescription drug overdose state in the country.

 

Make a Difference:

What You Can Do To Make a Difference

You can help us to reduce the rate of illicit drug addiction and drug overdose deaths in our state. When you are prescribed an opioid drug, be sure to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the risks and side-effects. Because 70% of individuals obtain opioid drugs for nonmedical use from a friend or relative, it is vital that you keep all opioid prescriptions in a secure location. If you do not finish your entire opioid prescription, properly dispose of the drug by filling the prescription bottle with water and placing it in a waste receptacle out of the reach of children. Some local communities also offer "drop-off" containers for unwanted prescription drugs. Contact your local law enforcement to find out more about this service.

 

New Mexico Data:

*Pain killer to get high definition: Used a pain killer, like Vicodin, OxyContin, or Percocet, to get high in the past 30 days

Source: YRRS (NM); CDC YRBS (US); NMDOH Survey Section (NOTE: Brackets around reported rates are 95% confidence intervals)




 

National Data:

*Pain killer to get high definition: Used a pain killer, like Vicodin, OxyContin, or Percocet, to get high in the past 30 days

Source: YRRS (NM); CDC YRBS (US); NMDOH Survey Section (NOTE: Brackets around reported rates are 95% confidence intervals)

 

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